D&D at Your Local Library

I ran across an article about Dungeons & Dragons while reading Wil Wheaton’s blog (yes, that Wil Wheaton). Anyway, it seems that Wizards of the Coast, the company that now owns Dungeons & Dragons, is sponsoring an after-school D&D program for libraries.

The Afternoon Adventure with DUNGEONS & DRAGONS program will include everything librarians need to start regular gaming programs in their library with the original pen-and-paper roleplaying game Dungeons & Dragons (D&D for short). Players assume the persona of fantasy characters and pursue magical adventures, confronting and solving problems using strategic thinking and teamwork. For three decades, D&D has appealed to an ever-increasing population of fans for its use of imagination and storytelling over competition. This free program will include a Dungeons & Dragons Basic Game (a $24.99 value), instructions for starting a D&D group in the library, a guide to using D&D as an introduction to library use, recommended reading lists, and other practical resources.

While I was not a D&D fanatic, I did play some while growing up (especially in High School). I certainly hope that a lot of libraries take advantage of this program. D&D teaches kids to think creatively, to look for the non-formulaic solution to difficult situations (i.e. to think outside the box), and it throws a little math into the equation as well. It also forces kids to read, study, and learn (and this is always a good thing).

I know the Christian fundamentalists will probably have a cow, but D&D in and of itself is not evil. While role-playing can be taken to extremes, so can playing too many video games or eating, or drinking alcohol. D&D and other role-playing games can help kids build confidence in themselves. I hope our local library takes advantage of this offering.

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2 Comments

  1. I caught that from Mr Wheton too.
    wrote about it on my blog
    hope it takes off

    D&D needs a good rep

  2. Unfortunately I haven’t played in many years. I still run across my Players Handbook every now and then. It brings back good memories.

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