Sonicwall – 552 MS-Office file containing VBA macros found inside of the email

We were having clients say that they were unable to send us emails containing VBA macros. After spending at least 45 minutes checking all of our usual suscpects, I finally got a copy of the error message the client was getting, and they forwarded me the following error: 552 MS-Office file containing VBA macros found inside of the email.

At this point it I realized it was not coming from our mailhost. I quick bit of googling and I found that this was being blocked at the firewall level. It appears that Sonicwall firewalls when they have enabled the Gateway AV security service will block VBA macros as an option. It is a configuration option to enable or disable.

 

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Review: Script Your Documentation Instantly

If you are anything like me you probably have little to no documentation on your servers. Probably it is because you don’t have the time or the personal to perform the tedious (and boring) work required; you know it is important, but other things seem to take priority. Well, you no longer have any excuse for not getting it done.

SYDI (Script Your Documentation Instantly) is an open source solution that will document your Windows Servers, MS SQL Servers, and Exchange Organizations. It is a fantastically easy product to use. In its simplest form, it will query an individual server and produce a Microsoft Word document detailing the hardware, software, networking, user accounts and storage settings with a table of contents and loads of other useful information. With a little extra work, you can have it query all of your servers and produce a set of XML files that can be converted in to HTML documents (using an included script) that makes publishing a breeze.

Using SYDI is really simple; it is just a VBS script that is launched from a command prompt. You do need to have Microsoft Word installed on the workstation if you want it to produce the documentation in that format. The software is written by an IT Consultant named Patrick Ogenstad. He has posted some really good how-to guides on his site.

I highly recommend that you take a look at SYDI and use it to help jump start you server documentation project. I did and in about 30 minutes I had published our server configs on our Network Management server.

Cacti’s Painless Network Monitoring


For the past week I’ve submersed myself in the world of Cacti, and have been have a lot of fun making cool graphs. As my staff will attest, I’m really big into monitoring anything and everything on our network. I find it’s very helpful to be able to track usage, capacity, growth, and a bunch of other things. Without some kind of baseline how do you know if things are operating as they should?

Oh, so you’re wondering what Cacti is, well here is the developer’s description:

Cacti is a complete network graphing solution designed to harness the power of RRDTool‘s data storage and graphing functionality. Cacti provides a fast poller, advanced graph templating, multiple data acquisition methods, and user management features out of the box. All of this is wrapped in an intuitive, easy to use interface that makes sense for LAN-sized installations up to complex networks with hundreds of devices.

Anyway, I’ve been using MRTG for last 8+ years to graph utilization, etc. It was a great product, and I’ve built up a number of useful scripts and hacks to monitor all kinds of things from Windows boxes to printers to email queues. I’ve even built a neat menu system, but it was a real hack. It was hard to manage, add devices, or even make changes. I’ve followed the RRDTool world for a while (and even moved my MRTG configs over to using RRD), but never found a solution that was easy to use and had the flexibility I wanted/needed. That was until I stumbled across Cacti.

Cacti has a templating system that makes adding new devices easy, it as an active user community that is sharing their templates for graphs, and device monitoring. It is really powerful and actually quite easy to use. It even integrates with Nagios, although I have yet to accomplish that integration. In the coming weeks I’ll be sharing my adventures with the installation and configuration as well as some of the templates that I have used and created/modified. So stay tuned for further post about Cacti.